M25 protests prompt anger from police chief for putting officers in danger

, M25 protests prompt anger from police chief for putting officers in danger, The Evepost BBC News

The M25 climate protests have prompted anger from a police chief for putting officers in danger, as they back the Government’s injunction proposal.

The Assistant Chief Constable from Humberside Police has said that police officers “should not have to patrol the M25 waiting for protesters to turn up”.

Chris Noble, 43, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “The people most likely to come to harm at the moment are probably police officers for having to run across motorways, try and remove protesters as well as ironically keep them safe from themselves.”

This comes as Government officials announced they are seeking an injunction against the environmental group Insulate Britain, after it shut down the M25 five times in just over a week.

Home Secretary Priti Patel and Transport Secretary Grant Shapps vowed to ensure “guerrilla” activists “cannot keep disrupting and endangering people’s lives“.

, M25 protests prompt anger from police chief for putting officers in danger, The Evepost BBC News

Environment Secretary George Eustice told Sky News: “We are taking legal action, I understand, to seek an injunction that would give police stronger powers to be able to intervene pre-emptively to stop these protests happening so that you are not getting a situation where you have to wait for them to sit on the road, cause chaos and then have to remove them after the event.”

The legal action, expected to be sought at the High Court on Thursday, came after Surrey Police arrested 38 activists from the group who targeted junctions 9 and 10 of Britain’s busiest motorway at 7.57am on Tuesday.

Footage taken at the scene by LBC showed the protesters walking on to the motorway and sitting down on the ground in front of moving traffic.

, M25 protests prompt anger from police chief for putting officers in danger, The Evepost BBC News

Mr Eustice acknowledged the protests were “very frustrating for people trying to get to work, go about their business”.